On The Aurat March Shaan Just Shared His Thoughts

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On The Aurat March Shaan Just Shared His Thoughts

 

Aurat March is an occasion that’s taken the nation by storm. Pakistanis got together through the board to request equality for all. However, the March was met with severe criticism for people that are yet to unlearn internalized misogyny. One of those criticisms came out of a Twitter user that believed that feminists are insulting women by being as outspoken as they were throughout the March.

Aurat March
Aurat March

However, the tweet comes from a location where it just further highlights how powerful the stigma which revolves around menstruation is.

It has to be recalled that intervals aren’t a luxury.
According to UNICEF, 79% of women in Pakistan don’t handle periods hygienically which is why it’s very important to emphasize this kind of issue publicly. The placard speaks for all those women who can not afford appropriate menstrual hygiene, contracting disorders which may be prevented. Additionally, it highlights how it is incorrect to capitalize on something so vital to menstruating people.

The other Twitter user stepped forward to describe what the placards actually meant and how not everybody in the nation can manage a sanitary napkin.

But alas. The thing was not set to rest and then.

Shaan responded to the tweet from stating he agrees with all the woman but there are different ways to go about highlighting the matter.


He suggested an all women’s committee should be formed and also be introduced before a FEMALE MINISTER. LOL. Additionally, all this should be carried out in solitude because of HAWW HAYE, Periods?

The super patient Twitter user attempted to inquire what was disgusting about menstruation whilst agreeing that something has to be done about the matter at hand.

However, Shaan said that there is nothing disgusting about menstruation, nevertheless, it should be a personal issue.


It is taking me some time to decipher this, it really is. Contradictions are galore. So…it is not obscene? However, the problem shouldn’t be raised openly? How can we increase consciousness about menstrual hygiene and health when we do not speak about it openly?

No matter the tweet gained attention and contributed to a significant argument — the sorts of which are significant, PUBLICLY, so as to boost awareness.

Some folks pointed out how authorities should subsidize sanitary napkins to boost access.

Others emphasized how such issues require a bigger platform so as to be emphasized.


Still another individual wondered out loud how people who couldn’t afford menstrual hygiene goods were dealing.

With films being created on menstruation and winning academy awards, why are we, as a country, nevertheless bound by the idea of menstraution becoming a taboo subject?

 

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